We are hosting The Feast, Jakarta on October 11th.
The Feast Worldwide is a day of global dinner parties in 40+ cities across 6 continents. The goal? To spark collaborations that drive local entrepreneurs and social initiatives forward, to build a future that we want for our city. The idea is simple - we are hosting a dinner and inviting incredible entrepreneurs, “doers” not just “do-gooders”, to share their work, the challenges they face, and how they overcome them. Through the sharing of ideas and experiences over a casual dinner meal, we want to foster an environment where people can ask why the world works the way it does, but not stop at “because it’s always been done that way”; they are unafraid to re-imagine how things can be and believe that the world, and us, can do better.
http://feastongood.com/worldwide/hubs/ High-res

We are hosting The Feast, Jakarta on October 11th.

The Feast Worldwide is a day of global dinner parties in 40+ cities across 6 continents. The goal? To spark collaborations that drive local entrepreneurs and social initiatives forward, to build a future that we want for our city. The idea is simple - we are hosting a dinner and inviting incredible entrepreneurs, “doers” not just “do-gooders”, to share their work, the challenges they face, and how they overcome them. Through the sharing of ideas and experiences over a casual dinner meal, we want to foster an environment where people can ask why the world works the way it does, but not stop at “because it’s always been done that way”; they are unafraid to re-imagine how things can be and believe that the world, and us, can do better.

http://feastongood.com/worldwide/hubs/

3 things about Indonesia

Here are 3 things that show us the shift in Indonesian mindset – based on two Jakarta post articles. 

Happy reading!

1st: Reassess Resources

Jokowi is restructuring the cabinet ministries. His biggest approach to this is: Efficiency and effectiveness. Why do you need 3 ministries doing one thing when you could have one doing 3 things? 

This means that slowly, we may see a shift in mindset of Indonesians wherein managing and maximizing resources will become of most importance. We’ll see more of multitalented, street smart and super resourceful youth who will easily call B.S. on wastefulness. 

2nd: Creative Economy

One of the new ministries that Jokowi is introducing is the ‘Creative Economy Ministry’ . We will see more support going towards ‘Hobbinomics’ and pursuing creative streams to build one’s life on. 

I am guessing that this will affect the confidence with which youth can now pursue what they really are interested in. 

Nath, this can even affect how kids are brought up in the future. 

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2014/09/15/jokowi-have-new-ministries-eliminate-deputy-ministers.html

3rd: Rise of the amphibian Indonesian

This article is an example of how youth today are crossovers of cultures – they have a serious, academic, ‘right’ side to them while they have an exploratory, self-indulging side to them as well. Their daily stories and struggles are mostly set around this theme of trying to migrate different worlds at once. Their ‘versatility’ is their biggest strength. 

This specific one talks about Intan Paramaditha, who is a fiction writer but is also versatile enough to be an academic researcher. 

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2014/09/15/intan-paramaditha-in-between-two-worlds.html

modernworker:

"…we are seeing a fascinating shift in who is guiding the flow of work. In fact it is a complete reversal from top-down to bottom-up. Employees are bringing new attitudes, ideas, values and expectations with them into the workplace. These are all getting passed up to managers, who are being forced to adapt in order to attract and retain top talent, and managers in turn are passing it up to the organization, driving broad-based change across the entire company. Dan Pink echoed this shift when he said, ‘talented people need organizations less than organizations need talented people.’"
from 5 TRENDS SHAPING THE FUTURE OF WORK by Vala Afshar and Jacob Morgan
High-res

modernworker:

"…we are seeing a fascinating shift in who is guiding the flow of work. In fact it is a complete reversal from top-down to bottom-up. Employees are bringing new attitudes, ideas, values and expectations with them into the workplace. These are all getting passed up to managers, who are being forced to adapt in order to attract and retain top talent, and managers in turn are passing it up to the organization, driving broad-based change across the entire company. Dan Pink echoed this shift when he said, ‘talented people need organizations less than organizations need talented people.’"

from 5 TRENDS SHAPING THE FUTURE OF WORK by Vala Afshar and Jacob Morgan

"Funny thing is, through all of this, there was tons of praise from everyone around me for the work I was doing. My work helped win 100s of millions of dollars in revenue for my agencies, helped to recruit new talent and won many awards. But to me, all the praise and acknowledgement was just a lie. “If they only knew the truth” they would send me packing.

It was exhausting, and even though I didn’t believe the praise, I needed the praise. I needed some sort of evidence that people believed, even falsely, that I was good enough to keep my job. If there was silence, I’d go completely in my head and think “they’ve all figured it out! They all know now! It’s just a matter of time before I get fired!” It never happened. All that noise was just noise in my head generated by the 8-year-old boy still living in there, scared to death of ever being discovered and shamed.”
- Alex

"My personal favorite is the mini-umbrella. But think about the depths this agency team went for this Sony campaign. They took in the client brief (and considered it a starting point).

They figured out that focusing on the apps, not the phone, would deliver the brief, and way more.

They came up with and produced the apps that would be featured in the ads.
They wrote and produced the ads.”

The Rastafari Movement

I have spent the last couple of months reading and learning as much as I can about religion. I am glad to have stumbled upon the Rastafari movement (because of the movie ‘Journey to Jah’ & Wikipedia)- a more recent manifestation of religion and spiritual enlightenment with the rise of ‘A black Christ’ in the 1930s.

Some interesting facets of Rastafari are that even to refer to the collective, they use “I and I”. “I and I” is used instead of “We” to emphasize the equality between all people.

One of the rituals of Rastafari is a “reasoning” is a simple event where the Rastas gather, smoke cannabis (“ganja”), and discuss.

And interestingly, the rastafaris have modified the english vocabulary to fit well into their belief system. An example of this is the creation of the word: “Overstanding”, which replaces “understanding” to denote an enlightenment which places one in a better position.

The very first company I started failed with a great bang. The second one failed a little bit less, but still failed. The third one, you know, proper failed, but it was kind of okay. I recovered quickly. Number four almost didn’t fail. It still didn’t really feel great, but it did okay. Number five was PayPal.

Max Levchin, former CTO of PayPal (via krisnair)

(via gurupanguji)

Reggae music has never been a subject of my conversations or curiosity but last night, I was introduced to it through an Indonesian reggae musician (Ras Muhamad), opening for a movie about the German ‘Gentleman’ in search of the meaning and soul of reggae, set in beautiful Jamaica.
Music is the language of the soul. Growing up in one of the most violent ghettos in Jamaica, Terry Lynn used reggae music to raise her voice against social inequality. If there’s a gay reggae singer and he wants to talk about homosexuality, he will sing about it. And that makes it more powerful and ensures its heard and felt.
If you live in Jakarta and haven’t yet been to Goethe for the German Cinema festival, it ends on Thursday so make sure to take some time out and catch some of the movies there.


Here’s the trailer of the movie: Journey to Jah High-res

Reggae music has never been a subject of my conversations or curiosity but last night, I was introduced to it through an Indonesian reggae musician (Ras Muhamad), opening for a movie about the German ‘Gentleman’ in search of the meaning and soul of reggae, set in beautiful Jamaica.

Music is the language of the soul. Growing up in one of the most violent ghettos in Jamaica, Terry Lynn used reggae music to raise her voice against social inequality. If there’s a gay reggae singer and he wants to talk about homosexuality, he will sing about it. And that makes it more powerful and ensures its heard and felt.

If you live in Jakarta and haven’t yet been to Goethe for the German Cinema festival, it ends on Thursday so make sure to take some time out and catch some of the movies there.

Here’s the trailer of the movie: Journey to Jah

"Poor Robin Williams, briefly enduring that lonely moment of morbid certainty where it didn’t matter how funny he was or who loved him or how many lachrymose obituaries would be written … He obviously dealt with a pain that was impossible to render and ultimately insurmountable, the sentimentality perhaps an accompaniment to his childlike brilliance … Robin Williams could have tapped anyone in the western world on the shoulder and told them he felt down and they would have told him not to worry, that he was great, that they loved him.

He must have known that. He must have known his wife and kids loved him, that his mates all thought he was great, that millions of strangers the world over held him in their hearts, a hilarious stranger that we could rely on to anarchically interrupt, the all-encompassing sadness of the world. Today Robin Williams is part of the sad narrative that we used to turn to him to disrupt.”

"What I might do is watch Mrs Doubtfire. Or Dead Poets Society or Good Will Hunting and I might be nice to people, mindful today how fragile we all are, how delicate we are, even when fizzing with divine madness that seems like it will never expire."