Starbucks’ first global brand campaign is:

  1. About people, not itself
  2. Its truly global - not an adapted - show asian faces to talk about global kind a way but in a really global way
  3. Based on a real insight “Meet me at Starbucks” is the biggest reason for going to Starbucks and its true

Via Adweek

The creator of Before Sunrise trilogy brings a movie that has been shot over 12 years and follows Mason through his boyhood - discovering his first view of the world to navigating his sanity through his parent’s divorce.

It shares a similar pace with the Before Sunrise series and springs up pleasant, insightful surprises along the storyline.

Give it a go, for sure.

“Boyhood” functions as a de facto time capsule — you could chart the cultural shifts of the past 12 years by the way Mason’s video-gaming preferences progress from Game Boy Advance to Wii or how the soundtrack moves from Coldplay’s earnest 2000 guitar ballad “Yellow” to Daft Punk’s earnest-in-a-different-way 2013 dance hit “Get Lucky” — but the film is not a documentary. “I do want people to think what they’re seeing on screen is real,” Linklater says. “But this is solely fiction. The whole thing is a narrative construct.”

Rain falls on Hong Kong’s #UmbrellaRevolution
SCMP: Protesters in Hong Kong have defied heavy rain as they continue to gather on the eve of China’s October 1st National Day, a major public holiday celebrated across the country, to protest the city’s embattled chief executive and to fight for democratic elections.
Photo: Rain falls on Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (Felix Wong) High-res

Rain falls on Hong Kong’s #UmbrellaRevolution

SCMP: Protesters in Hong Kong have defied heavy rain as they continue to gather on the eve of China’s October 1st National Day, a major public holiday celebrated across the country, to protest the city’s embattled chief executive and to fight for democratic elections.

Photo: Rain falls on Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (Felix Wong)

Negative events affect us more than positive ones. We remember them more vividly and they play a larger role in shaping our lives. Farewells, accidents, bad parenting, financial losses and even a random snide comment take up most of our psychic space, leaving little room for compliments or pleasant experiences to help us along life’s challenging path. The staggering human ability to adapt ensures that joy over a salary hike will abate within months, leaving only a benchmark for future raises. We feel pain, but not the absence of it.

Losada’s controversial ‘critical positivity ratio’, devised with psychologist Barbara Fredrickson of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and based on complex mathematics, aimed to serve up the perfect formula of 3-6:1. In other words, hearing praise between three and six times as often as criticism, the researchers said, sustained employee satisfaction, success in love, and most other measures of a flourishing, happy life. The paper with the formula, entitled ‘Positive Affect and the Complex Dynamics of Human Flourishing’, was published by the respected journal American Psychologist in 2005.

As throngs of pro-democracy protesters continue to organize in Hong Kong’s central business district, many of them are messaging one another through a network that doesn’t require cell towers or Wi-Fi nodes.

They’re using an app called FireChat that launched in March and is underpinned by mesh networking, which lets phones unite to form a temporary Internet. So far, mesh networks have proven themselves quite effective and quickly adopted during times of disaster or political unrest, as they don’t rely on existing cable and wireless networks.

In Iraq, tens of thousands of people have downloaded FireChat as the government limits connectivity in an effort to curb ISIS communications. Protesters in Taiwan this spring turned to FireChat when cell signals were too weak and at times nonexistent.

The evolution of Peggy Olsen

Spending a few hours every week to be a part-time student at the Indonesian Heritage Society to do something I have never done in my life: be a guide at the museum. So, post November, make sure to visit the National Museum when you are in Jakarta. When you do, I’ll be your guide.  High-res

Spending a few hours every week to be a part-time student at the Indonesian Heritage Society to do something I have never done in my life: be a guide at the museum. 

So, post November, make sure to visit the National Museum when you are in Jakarta. When you do, I’ll be your guide.
 

We are hosting The Feast, Jakarta on October 11th.
The Feast Worldwide is a day of global dinner parties in 40+ cities across 6 continents. The goal? To spark collaborations that drive local entrepreneurs and social initiatives forward, to build a future that we want for our city. The idea is simple - we are hosting a dinner and inviting incredible entrepreneurs, “doers” not just “do-gooders”, to share their work, the challenges they face, and how they overcome them. Through the sharing of ideas and experiences over a casual dinner meal, we want to foster an environment where people can ask why the world works the way it does, but not stop at “because it’s always been done that way”; they are unafraid to re-imagine how things can be and believe that the world, and us, can do better.
http://feastongood.com/worldwide/hubs/ High-res

We are hosting The Feast, Jakarta on October 11th.

The Feast Worldwide is a day of global dinner parties in 40+ cities across 6 continents. The goal? To spark collaborations that drive local entrepreneurs and social initiatives forward, to build a future that we want for our city. The idea is simple - we are hosting a dinner and inviting incredible entrepreneurs, “doers” not just “do-gooders”, to share their work, the challenges they face, and how they overcome them. Through the sharing of ideas and experiences over a casual dinner meal, we want to foster an environment where people can ask why the world works the way it does, but not stop at “because it’s always been done that way”; they are unafraid to re-imagine how things can be and believe that the world, and us, can do better.

http://feastongood.com/worldwide/hubs/

3 things about Indonesia

Here are 3 things that show us the shift in Indonesian mindset – based on two Jakarta post articles. 

Happy reading!

1st: Reassess Resources

Jokowi is restructuring the cabinet ministries. His biggest approach to this is: Efficiency and effectiveness. Why do you need 3 ministries doing one thing when you could have one doing 3 things? 

This means that slowly, we may see a shift in mindset of Indonesians wherein managing and maximizing resources will become of most importance. We’ll see more of multitalented, street smart and super resourceful youth who will easily call B.S. on wastefulness. 

2nd: Creative Economy

One of the new ministries that Jokowi is introducing is the ‘Creative Economy Ministry’ . We will see more support going towards ‘Hobbinomics’ and pursuing creative streams to build one’s life on. 

I am guessing that this will affect the confidence with which youth can now pursue what they really are interested in. 

Nath, this can even affect how kids are brought up in the future. 

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2014/09/15/jokowi-have-new-ministries-eliminate-deputy-ministers.html

3rd: Rise of the amphibian Indonesian

This article is an example of how youth today are crossovers of cultures – they have a serious, academic, ‘right’ side to them while they have an exploratory, self-indulging side to them as well. Their daily stories and struggles are mostly set around this theme of trying to migrate different worlds at once. Their ‘versatility’ is their biggest strength. 

This specific one talks about Intan Paramaditha, who is a fiction writer but is also versatile enough to be an academic researcher. 

http://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2014/09/15/intan-paramaditha-in-between-two-worlds.html

modernworker:

"…we are seeing a fascinating shift in who is guiding the flow of work. In fact it is a complete reversal from top-down to bottom-up. Employees are bringing new attitudes, ideas, values and expectations with them into the workplace. These are all getting passed up to managers, who are being forced to adapt in order to attract and retain top talent, and managers in turn are passing it up to the organization, driving broad-based change across the entire company. Dan Pink echoed this shift when he said, ‘talented people need organizations less than organizations need talented people.’"
from 5 TRENDS SHAPING THE FUTURE OF WORK by Vala Afshar and Jacob Morgan
High-res

modernworker:

"…we are seeing a fascinating shift in who is guiding the flow of work. In fact it is a complete reversal from top-down to bottom-up. Employees are bringing new attitudes, ideas, values and expectations with them into the workplace. These are all getting passed up to managers, who are being forced to adapt in order to attract and retain top talent, and managers in turn are passing it up to the organization, driving broad-based change across the entire company. Dan Pink echoed this shift when he said, ‘talented people need organizations less than organizations need talented people.’"

from 5 TRENDS SHAPING THE FUTURE OF WORK by Vala Afshar and Jacob Morgan

"Funny thing is, through all of this, there was tons of praise from everyone around me for the work I was doing. My work helped win 100s of millions of dollars in revenue for my agencies, helped to recruit new talent and won many awards. But to me, all the praise and acknowledgement was just a lie. “If they only knew the truth” they would send me packing.

It was exhausting, and even though I didn’t believe the praise, I needed the praise. I needed some sort of evidence that people believed, even falsely, that I was good enough to keep my job. If there was silence, I’d go completely in my head and think “they’ve all figured it out! They all know now! It’s just a matter of time before I get fired!” It never happened. All that noise was just noise in my head generated by the 8-year-old boy still living in there, scared to death of ever being discovered and shamed.”
- Alex