Just because she reads Cosmo (or drinks one) doesn’t mean she won’t read NPR or be interested in politics.

"I think that women’s lives are multilayered. I have no problem understanding that women are interested in mascara and the Middle East. Men are allowed to talk about sports relentlessly, and yet we still take them seriously. I don’t understand why women can’t talk about fashion or love, or wanting more money and not be taken as seriously as men." 
- Coles, Editor in Chief of Cosmopolitan

Do-Gooders unite in Jakarta as part of FEAST ON GOOD, 2014
“The evening saw a gathering of a motley assortment of Indonesians and expiates, who are either already involved in one or more initiatives with a social-purpose, or are inclined to do so. The opening address was a special video message from none other than the president of The Feast, who happened to be a spunky boy. He appeared much wiser than this young age would suggest, with the following advise, “Keep looking good while you’re doing good, the Feast!”
A round of introductions followed, with everyone present sharing “How I will bring my awesome to the world.” It included interesting answers ranging from spending time to hone entrepreneurship skills, to empowering underprivileged children through sports.”
Read More High-res

Do-Gooders unite in Jakarta as part of FEAST ON GOOD, 2014

The evening saw a gathering of a motley assortment of Indonesians and expiates, who are either already involved in one or more initiatives with a social-purpose, or are inclined to do so. The opening address was a special video message from none other than the president of The Feast, who happened to be a spunky boy. He appeared much wiser than this young age would suggest, with the following advise, “Keep looking good while you’re doing good, the Feast!”

A round of introductions followed, with everyone present sharing “How I will bring my awesome to the world.” It included interesting answers ranging from spending time to hone entrepreneurship skills, to empowering underprivileged children through sports.”

Read More

"It’s partly that, but it’s more than that," Arnett says. "There’s a space that’s opened up in the 20s that is the most individualistic time of life. When you think about it, when are you freer from social rules than in your 20s?" "I describe it as the self-focused time in life," he says. "I don’t mean that they’re selfish; I mean that they have fewer social rules and obligations — the freedom to be self-directed."

More recently and perhaps most importantly, it’s been found that people who learn a second language, even in adulthood, can better avoid cognitive decline in old age. In fact, when everything else is controlled for, bilinguals who come down with dementia and Alzheimer’s do so about four-and-a-half years later than monolinguals. Dr. Thomas Bak, a lecturer in the philosophy, psychology, and language sciences department at the University of Edinburgh, conducted the study and found that level of education and intelligence mattered less than learning a second language when it came to delaying cognitive decline. “It’s not the good memory that bilinguals have that is delaying cognitive decline,” Bak told me. “It’s their attention mechanism. Their ability to focus in on the details of language.”
Polyglots tend to be good at paying attention in a wide variety of ways, especially when performing visual tasks (like searching a scene or a list for a specific name or object) and when multitasking, which, according to Bak’s theory, is likely improved thanks to the practice of mentally switching between one’s native and foreign language while learning the foreign language.

For a Better Brain, Learn Another Language - The Atlantic (via wildcat2030)

(via wildcat2030)

Sebangsa, which translates as “One People” or “One Nation” app launched in Indonesia. Sebangsa does feel a bit like Line, Twitter, Path and Facebook rolled into one. It has a timeline filled by the contacts a user follows, it has private and public groups as well as a private messaging channel. It lets users post photos — even multiple pictures at the same time — and audio messages. Public posts are searchable based on hashtags. High-res

Sebangsa, which translates as “One People” or “One Nation” app launched in Indonesia. Sebangsa does feel a bit like Line, Twitter, Path and Facebook rolled into one. It has a timeline filled by the contacts a user follows, it has private and public groups as well as a private messaging channel. It lets users post photos — even multiple pictures at the same time — and audio messages. Public posts are searchable based on hashtags.

dragosbardac:

Great food at @laceaunbrasov + awesome @instagram friends = makes #takemetoromania happy 😃👍
"Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it.” Stephen Hawking (at La Ceaun)
High-res

dragosbardac:

Great food at @laceaunbrasov + awesome @instagram friends = makes #takemetoromania happy 😃👍

"Work gives you meaning and purpose and life is empty without it.” Stephen Hawking
(at La Ceaun)

The other hand

"Men came from the city one day and they gave us clockwork radios, one to each family in the village. We were supposed to wind them up and listen to the world service from the BBC, but my sister Nkiruka turned ours into the Port Harcourt music station instead. We used to fight over the little wind-up box because I liked to listen to the news and the current affairs. But now that I was hiding in the jungle behind the beach I wished I had never fought with my sister. Nkiruka loved music and now I saw that she was right because life is extremely short and you cannot dance to current affairs.”

Starbucks’ first global brand campaign is:

  1. About people, not itself
  2. Its truly global - not an adapted - show asian faces to talk about global kind a way but in a really global way
  3. Based on a real insight “Meet me at Starbucks” is the biggest reason for going to Starbucks and its true

Via Adweek

The creator of Before Sunrise trilogy brings a movie that has been shot over 12 years and follows Mason through his boyhood - discovering his first view of the world to navigating his sanity through his parent’s divorce.

It shares a similar pace with the Before Sunrise series and springs up pleasant, insightful surprises along the storyline.

Give it a go, for sure.

“Boyhood” functions as a de facto time capsule — you could chart the cultural shifts of the past 12 years by the way Mason’s video-gaming preferences progress from Game Boy Advance to Wii or how the soundtrack moves from Coldplay’s earnest 2000 guitar ballad “Yellow” to Daft Punk’s earnest-in-a-different-way 2013 dance hit “Get Lucky” — but the film is not a documentary. “I do want people to think what they’re seeing on screen is real,” Linklater says. “But this is solely fiction. The whole thing is a narrative construct.”

Rain falls on Hong Kong’s #UmbrellaRevolution
SCMP: Protesters in Hong Kong have defied heavy rain as they continue to gather on the eve of China’s October 1st National Day, a major public holiday celebrated across the country, to protest the city’s embattled chief executive and to fight for democratic elections.
Photo: Rain falls on Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (Felix Wong) High-res

Rain falls on Hong Kong’s #UmbrellaRevolution

SCMP: Protesters in Hong Kong have defied heavy rain as they continue to gather on the eve of China’s October 1st National Day, a major public holiday celebrated across the country, to protest the city’s embattled chief executive and to fight for democratic elections.

Photo: Rain falls on Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (Felix Wong)

Negative events affect us more than positive ones. We remember them more vividly and they play a larger role in shaping our lives. Farewells, accidents, bad parenting, financial losses and even a random snide comment take up most of our psychic space, leaving little room for compliments or pleasant experiences to help us along life’s challenging path. The staggering human ability to adapt ensures that joy over a salary hike will abate within months, leaving only a benchmark for future raises. We feel pain, but not the absence of it.

Losada’s controversial ‘critical positivity ratio’, devised with psychologist Barbara Fredrickson of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and based on complex mathematics, aimed to serve up the perfect formula of 3-6:1. In other words, hearing praise between three and six times as often as criticism, the researchers said, sustained employee satisfaction, success in love, and most other measures of a flourishing, happy life. The paper with the formula, entitled ‘Positive Affect and the Complex Dynamics of Human Flourishing’, was published by the respected journal American Psychologist in 2005.

As throngs of pro-democracy protesters continue to organize in Hong Kong’s central business district, many of them are messaging one another through a network that doesn’t require cell towers or Wi-Fi nodes.

They’re using an app called FireChat that launched in March and is underpinned by mesh networking, which lets phones unite to form a temporary Internet. So far, mesh networks have proven themselves quite effective and quickly adopted during times of disaster or political unrest, as they don’t rely on existing cable and wireless networks.

In Iraq, tens of thousands of people have downloaded FireChat as the government limits connectivity in an effort to curb ISIS communications. Protesters in Taiwan this spring turned to FireChat when cell signals were too weak and at times nonexistent.

The evolution of Peggy Olsen