"My personal favorite is the mini-umbrella. But think about the depths this agency team went for this Sony campaign. They took in the client brief (and considered it a starting point).

They figured out that focusing on the apps, not the phone, would deliver the brief, and way more.

They came up with and produced the apps that would be featured in the ads.
They wrote and produced the ads.”

The Rastafari Movement

I have spent the last couple of months reading and learning as much as I can about religion. I am glad to have stumbled upon the Rastafari movement (because of the movie ‘Journey to Jah’ & Wikipedia)- a more recent manifestation of religion and spiritual enlightenment with the rise of ‘A black Christ’ in the 1930s.

Some interesting facets of Rastafari are that even to refer to the collective, they use “I and I”. “I and I” is used instead of “We” to emphasize the equality between all people.

One of the rituals of Rastafari is a “reasoning” is a simple event where the Rastas gather, smoke cannabis (“ganja”), and discuss.

And interestingly, the rastafaris have modified the english vocabulary to fit well into their belief system. An example of this is the creation of the word: “Overstanding”, which replaces “understanding” to denote an enlightenment which places one in a better position.

The very first company I started failed with a great bang. The second one failed a little bit less, but still failed. The third one, you know, proper failed, but it was kind of okay. I recovered quickly. Number four almost didn’t fail. It still didn’t really feel great, but it did okay. Number five was PayPal.

Max Levchin, former CTO of PayPal (via krisnair)

(via gurupanguji)

Reggae music has never been a subject of my conversations or curiosity but last night, I was introduced to it through an Indonesian reggae musician (Ras Muhamad), opening for a movie about the German ‘Gentleman’ in search of the meaning and soul of reggae, set in beautiful Jamaica.
Music is the language of the soul. Growing up in one of the most violent ghettos in Jamaica, Terry Lynn used reggae music to raise her voice against social inequality. If there’s a gay reggae singer and he wants to talk about homosexuality, he will sing about it. And that makes it more powerful and ensures its heard and felt.
If you live in Jakarta and haven’t yet been to Goethe for the German Cinema festival, it ends on Thursday so make sure to take some time out and catch some of the movies there.


Here’s the trailer of the movie: Journey to Jah High-res

Reggae music has never been a subject of my conversations or curiosity but last night, I was introduced to it through an Indonesian reggae musician (Ras Muhamad), opening for a movie about the German ‘Gentleman’ in search of the meaning and soul of reggae, set in beautiful Jamaica.

Music is the language of the soul. Growing up in one of the most violent ghettos in Jamaica, Terry Lynn used reggae music to raise her voice against social inequality. If there’s a gay reggae singer and he wants to talk about homosexuality, he will sing about it. And that makes it more powerful and ensures its heard and felt.

If you live in Jakarta and haven’t yet been to Goethe for the German Cinema festival, it ends on Thursday so make sure to take some time out and catch some of the movies there.

Here’s the trailer of the movie: Journey to Jah

"Poor Robin Williams, briefly enduring that lonely moment of morbid certainty where it didn’t matter how funny he was or who loved him or how many lachrymose obituaries would be written … He obviously dealt with a pain that was impossible to render and ultimately insurmountable, the sentimentality perhaps an accompaniment to his childlike brilliance … Robin Williams could have tapped anyone in the western world on the shoulder and told them he felt down and they would have told him not to worry, that he was great, that they loved him.

He must have known that. He must have known his wife and kids loved him, that his mates all thought he was great, that millions of strangers the world over held him in their hearts, a hilarious stranger that we could rely on to anarchically interrupt, the all-encompassing sadness of the world. Today Robin Williams is part of the sad narrative that we used to turn to him to disrupt.”

"What I might do is watch Mrs Doubtfire. Or Dead Poets Society or Good Will Hunting and I might be nice to people, mindful today how fragile we all are, how delicate we are, even when fizzing with divine madness that seems like it will never expire."

"Emoji was crowned as this year’s top-trending word by the Global Language Monitor, and it was added to the Oxford English Dictionary (funny, because it’s a word that describes the concept of not actually using words). There is now a blog, Emojinalysis, that purports to psychoanalyze users’ most frequently used emoji (take a screenshot and send); a beta site, Emoj.li, for the first emoji-only social network (yes, as in only emoji); and the Unicode Consortium, the nonprofit devoted to emoji standardization across platforms, recently said it would add 250 emoji to Apple, Microsoft and Google products. I seriously considered adding an emoji sequence to my résumé this week."

From TIME: 
“Buried in the data was the revelation that almost half of millennials (43%, and higher among the youngest subset) said they would support a marriage model that involved a two-year trial — at which point the union could be either formalized or dissolved, no divorce or paperwork required. Thirty-three percent said they’d be open to trying what researchers dubbed the “real estate” approach — marriage licenses granted on a five-, seven-, 10- or 30-year ARM, after which the terms must be renegotiated. And 21% said they’d give the “presidential” method a try, whereby marriage vows last for four years but after eight you can elect to choose a new partner. High-res

From TIME:
“Buried in the data was the revelation that almost half of millennials (43%, and higher among the youngest subset) said they would support a marriage model that involved a two-year trial — at which point the union could be either formalized or dissolved, no divorce or paperwork required. Thirty-three percent said they’d be open to trying what researchers dubbed the “real estate” approach — marriage licenses granted on a five-, seven-, 10- or 30-year ARM, after which the terms must be renegotiated. And 21% said they’d give the “presidential” method a try, whereby marriage vows last for four years but after eight you can elect to choose a new partner.

  • Source: TIME

Snapdeal is now on track to handle more than $1 billion in sales this year for over 30,000 merchants across more than 500 categories of goods and services.

“We sell a sari every 12 seconds,” Mr. Bahl said. The rise of Indian e-commerce — which has started to gain traction only in recent years — has captured the attention of international investors. This year, Snapdeal has raised $233 million, with about half coming from the American Internet company eBay. Mr. Bahl said Snapdeal was considering an initial public offering in a year or two.

My thoughts on the Airtel 3G ‘Boss’ ad

The story shows how she’s reached a point in her career wherein she does the thinking, the planning and delegates the work to people she thinks can do the job. And she’s professional about it. Then, she goes home and decides to cook- because she gets home early and she’s being not just a ‘wife’ but a person who wants to do something, for someone who seems stressed. It’s as simple as that.

Do our ads have to be that literal wherein they also show how the guy probably got home early the day before and cooked dinner? and is called ‘Husband’ on her phone?

This ad does not try and question my independent thoughts, my career and my life. I am calling bull^%#@ on this sudden feminism rage because I didn’t see the Airtel ad as a threat to my gender or to girl power.

I know that I’ve come home early at times and cooked for Manoj and so has he. That doesn’t make me any less self-respecting, progressive (and also very cool) woman.

image

It’s not just Whisper that is enjoying the new hunger for anonymity. The anonymous tech gossip app Secret, which harvests your phone contacts to bring you unsigned titbits from your immediate circle, has just raised $25 million USD in venture capital with the aim of becoming a fully-fledged social network. The comment threads on the platform have become more of a focus than the actual secrets being shared, and CEO David Byttow is keen to capitalise on this: “It’s not just [the secret] – it’s actually all the discussion around it,” he says. “We have content that would fill hundreds of thousands of books should someone really want to read the dialogues. I think surfacing that is really valuable.”