"My parents were now brazenly close. They laughed a lot, but they also fought bitterly, sometimes bringing each other to tears, then promptly fumbling their way back to normal without apology or explanation because neither of them needed to be right as much as they needed to be together. Even mundane activities that were once simple—like going to parties, where they used to arrive in separate cars and leave at different times—became minefields of logistics and expectations. They wrestled over whose car to take, what time to go, how long to stay. It was as if, in deciding to be together, they had turned into one animal with two separate heads, each with distinct ideas about how to move through the world. Watching them became an exercise in worrying."

FOR GENERATION MOTH, DIGITALLY MEDIATED PRESENCE WILL FEEL COMPLETELY NATURAL.

However, the experiences that Generation Moth have in their daily lives will also have to provide the stimulation and interactivity that they experience socially. These expectations will impact a variety of industries, and there will be more appetite for experiencing virtually: online shoppers can try-on and sample products; travel planning could involve testing out a hotel bed or feeling what the weather there is like; a checkup with a physician may not require a visit.

booksactually:

EASTERN HEATHENSedited by Amanda Lee Koe & Ng Yi-ShengWe love Asian folklore. We grew up listening to Chinese legends, Arab fairy tales, Malay ghost stories and Indian sacred epics, and their fabulous images have continued to inhabit our imaginations ever since. Yet as grown-ups, we’ve sometimes been bugged by the moralistic, simplistic manner in which these fables are often told. What better way to negotiate this than to reinvent our heritage? This collection brings together 14 subversions, reinventions and adaptations of folktales from all across Asia, written by an international crew of authors. Within these pages, you’ll find a Cambodian horror story, a poetic meditation on Japanese fox spirits, a crime parable based on the Indian epic of the Ramayana, a sci-fi redaction of the Chinese legend of Lady White Snake, and many more exquisite gems. This book is a treasure trove of the imagination, containing tales both intelligent and wondrous, combining the best elements of Asian heritage with the wit of the 21st century.
High-res

booksactually:

EASTERN HEATHENS
edited by Amanda Lee Koe & Ng Yi-Sheng

We love Asian folklore. We grew up listening to Chinese legends, Arab fairy tales, Malay ghost stories and Indian sacred epics, and their fabulous images have continued to inhabit our imaginations ever since.

Yet as grown-ups, we’ve sometimes been bugged by the moralistic, simplistic manner in which these fables are often told. What better way to negotiate this than to reinvent our heritage? This collection brings together 14 subversions, reinventions and adaptations of folktales from all across Asia, written by an international crew of authors.

Within these pages, you’ll find a Cambodian horror story, a poetic meditation on Japanese fox spirits, a crime parable based on the Indian epic of the Ramayana, a sci-fi redaction of the Chinese legend of Lady White Snake, and many more exquisite gems.

This book is a treasure trove of the imagination, containing tales both intelligent and wondrous, combining the best elements of Asian heritage with the wit of the 21st century.

Coolest thing I have seen today. Move over Pharrell Wiliams.

Ok Go: The writings on the wall

“It’s not silver.” Her fingers closed on it. “It’s iron. Here.” She pressed it into his hand, the small black iron coin that Jaqen Hghar had given her, so worn the man whose head it bore had no features. It’s probably worthless, but… The captain turned it over and blinked at it, then looked at her again. “This… how… ?” Jaqen said to say the words too. Arya crossed her arms against her chest. “Valar morghulis,” she said, as loud as if she’d known what it meant. “Valar dohaeris,” he replied, touching his brow with two fingers. “Of course you shall have a cabin.”

(via tumblrofthrones)