It’s not just Whisper that is enjoying the new hunger for anonymity. The anonymous tech gossip app Secret, which harvests your phone contacts to bring you unsigned titbits from your immediate circle, has just raised $25 million USD in venture capital with the aim of becoming a fully-fledged social network. The comment threads on the platform have become more of a focus than the actual secrets being shared, and CEO David Byttow is keen to capitalise on this: “It’s not just [the secret] – it’s actually all the discussion around it,” he says. “We have content that would fill hundreds of thousands of books should someone really want to read the dialogues. I think surfacing that is really valuable.”

James Marcus Haney’s “No Cameras Allowed”

- Hack-culture thrives and brings more interesting to the world

He took a bullet for his gay best friend, who was speaking out against gun violence. Betty and Veronica were there in the last frames of the comic book to cradle him in death. No bobby socks and soda shops in this issue, that’s for sure. The teens we all wanted to be before we were old enough to be teens are dealing with grown-up issues and the tragedy of death.

When I Look In The Mirror from everdream on Vimeo.

What do you see when you look at yourself in the mirror? via The Curious Brain

"Some of the genes that friends were most likely to have in common involve smell. ‘We tend to smell things the same way that our friends do,’ Fowler says. The study involved nearly 2,000 adults. This suggests that as humans evolved, the ability to tolerate and be drawn to certain smells may have influenced where people hung out. Today we might call this the Starbucks effect." High-res

"Some of the genes that friends were most likely to have in common involve smell. ‘We tend to smell things the same way that our friends do,’ Fowler says. The study involved nearly 2,000 adults. This suggests that as humans evolved, the ability to tolerate and be drawn to certain smells may have influenced where people hung out. Today we might call this the Starbucks effect."

  • Source: NPR
From shepherdsongs:
"I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.” High-res

From shepherdsongs:

"I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

(via clareoplane)

Hundreds of participants were left in a room by themselves for several minutes with nothing to do but think. Rather than complete the task, many of them chose to administer electric shocks to themselves. As it turns out, most people prefer to do something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative, according to a study published in Science last week. 

In a series of 11 experiments, a team led by Timothy Wilson from the University of Virginia asked 409 college students to be alone with their thoughts in a bare room for 6 to 15 minutes: no phones, books, pens for doodling, or distractions of any kind. Just stay awake, be quiet, and sit idly in their seats. Some were given specific prompts, like plan a food outing, while others could think about whatever. 

via IFLscience High-res

Hundreds of participants were left in a room by themselves for several minutes with nothing to do but think. Rather than complete the task, many of them chose to administer electric shocks to themselves. As it turns out, most people prefer to do something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative, according to a study published in Science last week.

In a series of 11 experiments, a team led by Timothy Wilson from the University of Virginia asked 409 college students to be alone with their thoughts in a bare room for 6 to 15 minutes: no phones, books, pens for doodling, or distractions of any kind. Just stay awake, be quiet, and sit idly in their seats. Some were given specific prompts, like plan a food outing, while others could think about whatever.

via IFLscience

"If you’ve danced to an Afrobeat-heavy pop song, dipped hummus, sipped coconut water, participated in a Desi-inspired color run or sported a henna tattoo, then you’ve Columbused something. Columbusing is when you "discover" something that’s existed forever. Just that it’s existed outside your own culture, nationality, race or even, say, your neighborhood. Bonus points if you tell all your friends about it. Why not? In our immigrant-rich cities, the whole world is at our doorsteps."