When I Look In The Mirror from everdream on Vimeo.

What do you see when you look at yourself in the mirror? via The Curious Brain

"Some of the genes that friends were most likely to have in common involve smell. ‘We tend to smell things the same way that our friends do,’ Fowler says. The study involved nearly 2,000 adults. This suggests that as humans evolved, the ability to tolerate and be drawn to certain smells may have influenced where people hung out. Today we might call this the Starbucks effect." High-res

"Some of the genes that friends were most likely to have in common involve smell. ‘We tend to smell things the same way that our friends do,’ Fowler says. The study involved nearly 2,000 adults. This suggests that as humans evolved, the ability to tolerate and be drawn to certain smells may have influenced where people hung out. Today we might call this the Starbucks effect."

  • Source: NPR
From shepherdsongs:
"I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.” High-res

From shepherdsongs:

"I was driving past a business here in the Houston Heights, when I glimpsed this painted on the side of the building. I recognized that iconic WWII poster before I realized it was not just any woman, but 14 year old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani girl who was attacked for wanting an education. The words next to her are her quote, ( “I don’t mind if I have to sit on the floor at school.) All I want is education. And I’m afraid of no one.”

(via clareoplane)

Hundreds of participants were left in a room by themselves for several minutes with nothing to do but think. Rather than complete the task, many of them chose to administer electric shocks to themselves. As it turns out, most people prefer to do something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative, according to a study published in Science last week. 

In a series of 11 experiments, a team led by Timothy Wilson from the University of Virginia asked 409 college students to be alone with their thoughts in a bare room for 6 to 15 minutes: no phones, books, pens for doodling, or distractions of any kind. Just stay awake, be quiet, and sit idly in their seats. Some were given specific prompts, like plan a food outing, while others could think about whatever. 

via IFLscience High-res

Hundreds of participants were left in a room by themselves for several minutes with nothing to do but think. Rather than complete the task, many of them chose to administer electric shocks to themselves. As it turns out, most people prefer to do something rather than nothing, even if that something is negative, according to a study published in Science last week.

In a series of 11 experiments, a team led by Timothy Wilson from the University of Virginia asked 409 college students to be alone with their thoughts in a bare room for 6 to 15 minutes: no phones, books, pens for doodling, or distractions of any kind. Just stay awake, be quiet, and sit idly in their seats. Some were given specific prompts, like plan a food outing, while others could think about whatever.

via IFLscience

"If you’ve danced to an Afrobeat-heavy pop song, dipped hummus, sipped coconut water, participated in a Desi-inspired color run or sported a henna tattoo, then you’ve Columbused something. Columbusing is when you "discover" something that’s existed forever. Just that it’s existed outside your own culture, nationality, race or even, say, your neighborhood. Bonus points if you tell all your friends about it. Why not? In our immigrant-rich cities, the whole world is at our doorsteps."

"My parents were now brazenly close. They laughed a lot, but they also fought bitterly, sometimes bringing each other to tears, then promptly fumbling their way back to normal without apology or explanation because neither of them needed to be right as much as they needed to be together. Even mundane activities that were once simple—like going to parties, where they used to arrive in separate cars and leave at different times—became minefields of logistics and expectations. They wrestled over whose car to take, what time to go, how long to stay. It was as if, in deciding to be together, they had turned into one animal with two separate heads, each with distinct ideas about how to move through the world. Watching them became an exercise in worrying."

FOR GENERATION MOTH, DIGITALLY MEDIATED PRESENCE WILL FEEL COMPLETELY NATURAL.

However, the experiences that Generation Moth have in their daily lives will also have to provide the stimulation and interactivity that they experience socially. These expectations will impact a variety of industries, and there will be more appetite for experiencing virtually: online shoppers can try-on and sample products; travel planning could involve testing out a hotel bed or feeling what the weather there is like; a checkup with a physician may not require a visit.